Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Week Ten

If you are turning in Essays 1 and or 2,
  • print a copy of the essay and its Works Cited page
  • attach the Grading Checklist with your self-evaluation
  • attach any slips proving you have visited the Writing Center to get help with the essay.

Tuesday Meeting
Original cartoon by Tony Lopes
See more at Stoney Toons
Image from Sophia Literaria

Much Ado about Nothing is the text we will use for the in-class Final Exam, so you need to be very familiar with it. To help, today we will screen Kenneth Branagh's version of play.
If you are/were unable to come to class on Tuesday, November 21, search the film in our library's Streaming Media Project  HEREFor copyright reasons, you can only watch the film on campus. Otherwise, check the film information so you can rent it, watch it on YouTube, etc. HERE
2. Discussing the Final Exam. Once you have decided what question you want to answer, check the work you should complete for Journals 9, 10, and 11. Instructions and Prompts for Journals

    Online Work for Week Nine

    Note: items marked with an asterisk will count as your hour of online attendance for Week Nine.



    1. Review an introductory presentation on Much Ado about Nothing HERE.
    2. Review Much Ado about Nothing's Main Characters' Status, Alliances, and Relationships HERE.
    3. *Complete Journal 9. You will need the play for evidence. If you do not have Much Ado about Nothing, check the e-book HERE.
                _______________________________________________

      Tuesday, November 14, 2017

      Week Nine

      If you are turning in Essay 1,
      • print a copy of the essay and its Works Cited page
      • attach the Grading Checklist with your self-evaluation
      • attach any slips proving you have visited the Writing Center to get help with the essay.

      Tuesday Meeting

      1. Thesis Workshop

      If you submitted a thesis statement, I will put you in a group of maximum three people. Responses to thesis: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1wTspWplTQi8gy3myLFcPR2dfNc3EMCdVy4nIq4yPUo8/edit?usp=sharing

      If you did not submit a thesis statement, please do so now: https://goo.gl/forms/gpcpGVyvYvMvqDZU2

      We will write selected theses on the board.

      Criteria to consider for the evaluation of theses:

      Does it address the prompt? Review the prompt for Essay 2

      2. Writing Workshop

      Online Work for Week Nine

      Write Essay 2. Tell me when you intend to turn it in by completing this form:   https://goo.gl/forms/h22sDVPJQM0TjTDK2 
      Responses to form:   https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1Q7gIpzat4AjTk61slczL4AiFy9V9p1CINJL1iumT1vU/edit?usp=sharing

      Monday, November 6, 2017

      Week Eight

      Tuesday Meeting
      Iron Mask and Collar for Punishing Slaves, Brazil, 1817-1818
      Source: Jacques Arago, Souvenirs d'un aveugle. Voyage autour du monde... par M. J. Arago (Paris, 1839-40), 
      vol. 1, facing p. 119.
      From The Atlantic Slave Trade and Slave Life in the Americas
      by Jerome Handler and Michael Tuite
      Sponsored by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and the University of Virginia Library.
      "Did you speak to him? Didn't you say anything to him? Something!" [said Sethe.]
      "I couldn't, Sethe. I just... couldn't" [said Paul D.]
      "Why!"
      "I had a bit in my mouth."
         --From Toni Morrison, Beloved (84). 
      This image is one of the many representations of a series of masks, bridles, and mouth bits created to silence women and slaves. For more, see the blog U.S. Slave HERE (Warning: nasty images). To see how the tradition continues, if much abated, HERE. (Thanks to HiccupsS for the link!) 

      One of the many reasons why Butler's and especially Morrison's storytelling is important, therefore, is that they reclaim the power of language and representation for those who have been denied such a voice. Thus, Kindred touches on many "unspoken" issues that define present American culture. 
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Kindred Workshop

      Starting from  where we ended last class (or, in the case of 5:45, where we should have ended):

      Essential questions to answer:
      • How does the narrative of The American Dream ignore, deny, erase, or take over other narratives and realities? 
      • What and who are in danger when ignorance, denial, erasure, and overarching control by a such master narrative are encouraged to happen?
      Just in case you are interested: Major Themes in Kindred HERE

      Buckner Topsy Turvy 1901 doll.  Image and historical context below from Black Legacy Images.
      Oral history of the doll: A slave mother designed this type of doll for her children because slave children were not allowed to play with white dolls. When white people were present slave children always had to play with the black doll. The black doll was the only legal doll black children could play with in America during slave times.















      Online Work for Week Eight
      1. * Complete this form with a Tentative Thesis Statement for Essay 2
      2. Complete the Quiz on Literary Terms III on Blackboard based on THIS PRESENTATION



      Tuesday, October 31, 2017

      Week Seven

      2:15, check these slides created by 5:45: HERE, HERE, HERE, HERE.

      Tuesday Meeting

      Essay 2 Readings Workshop

      1. For the group/ reading you have been assigned: You will have 5 minutes to check your journal on the reading

      2. Have a copy of the reading handy. Left that packet at home? That's okay. Here it is.

      3. You will have 20 minutes to discuss the five questions assigned. Then each group will present its findings to the class whereupon we will try to make connections among readings in preparation for doing similar work with Kindred.

      Online Work for Week Seven
      Note: items marked with an asterisk will count as your hour of online attendance for Week Seven.

      1. * Journal 8 ("The Storm," "The Rope.")
      2. Quiz: Kindred: "The Storm," "The Rope."
      3. Quiz: Literary Terms II


      Tuesday, October 24, 2017

      Week Six

      The midterm evaluation of Journals 1-6 will be Wednesday, October 25 by 9:00 AM

      When you decide to turn in Essay 1,
      • print a copy of the essay and its Works Cited page
      • attach the Grading Checklist with your self-evaluation
      • attach any slips proving you have visited the Writing Center to get help with the essay.

      Tuesday Meeting

      Today we begin exploring the novel Kindred by Octavia E. Butler. This novel is partly set in Maryland before the American Civil War. To really understand the kind of world Dana, our protagonist, is time-traveling to, we need to do a bit of research on slavery in the United States.
      “Caution!! Colored People of Boston” Anti-Slavery Poster (1851)
      from The Boston Public Library

      The modern epoch was founded on European imperialism and African slavery. Both these systems were organized racially. The theft of labor and life, of land and resources, from millions of Africans and Native Americans, and from Asians and Pacific Islanders as well,  financed the rise of Europe and made possible both its subsequent mercantilism and its later industrialism. Conquest, imperial rule, and the chattelization of labor (principally but not entirely African labor) divided humanity into Europeans and "others." Ferocious and unending cultural and psychic energies were expended to sustain this schism, which was also constantly challenged and undermined in innumerable ways.
         --Howard Winant. New Politics of Race : Globalism, Difference, Justice: 205.

      A. Reflecting on images of slavery
      • Slides HERE. How does the picture make you feel? Does it seem strange or does it remind you of a familiar situation?
      B. Background for Kindred I: Slavery in the United States

      Part I:
        1. On the list below, find the topic that matches your assigned number
        1. Punishment 
        2. Slave Breeding
        3. House Slaves 
        4. Field Slaves 
        5. Education  
        6. Family Life  
        7. Whipping
        2. Visit the Spartacus Educational site Slavery in the United States at http://spartacus-educational.com/USAslavery.htm Scroll down until you see the topic “Slave Life.” Click on your topic.
        3. Read the entire page for your topic. On a piece of paper, summarize what you have read in about 250 words.

        Part II:
        I will put you in a group so all seven aspects of slavery are represented. Take about 2 minutes to tell the others what you have learned, using the summary to help you remember key ideas. The point is to acquire as much general information about slavery as possible in a short period of time. As you listen, write down the ideas that made the strongest impression on you.


        C. Background for Kindred IIThe Legacy of Slavery and Its Discontents

        We will discuss Butler's background as part of her motivation to write the novel: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kindred_(novel)#Background


        D. The legacy of slavery

        Consider the images that we looked at beginning of class. Now Go to Google Groups/ Drive and put together a short slide presentation with images from present-day circumstances that "match" or show how that situation or condition exists at present. Show the presentation to other people in the class

        From Aaron McGruder's The Boondocks: Because I Know You Don't Read the Newspaper (2000): 38.
        Image from Rad Geek People's Daily












        Online Work for Week Six
        Note: items marked with an asterisk will count as your hour of online attendance for Week Six.

        Tuesday, October 31 by 9:00AM:
        1. Quiz: "The Fight" on Blackboard
        2.  *Journal 7 (Kindred--"The Fight" II-sections 11-16)

        _____________________________________________________________________

        Tuesday, October 17, 2017

        Week Five

        As to Journal 4:  Nicely done, Paul H. (2:15) and Proche H. (5:45)!

        ...to discover that the flag to which you have pledged allegiance, along with everybody else, has not pledged allegiance to you.--James Baldwin, from his argument at the Cambridge University debate “Is the American Dream at the expense of the American Negro?” 
        Haven't seen a mill lately? Maybe this will help you understand the metaphor:
        Samples of a people that had undergone a terrible grinding and regrinding in the mill [...] shivered at every corner, passed in and out at every doorway, looked from every window, fluttered in every vestige of a garment that the wind shook. The mill which had worked them down, was the mill that grinds young people old; the children had ancient faces and grave voices. --Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities. 

        Tuesday Meeting

        1. Read Essay 1 instructions.

        2. Create a new document in your ENG102 Google Drive folder and share it so anyone with the link can comment. 

        3. Follow my instructions on the screen to ensure all parts of the essay are formatted correctly.

        4. Go to LaGuardia Library > Databases > Gale Virtual Reference Library (select the Intermediate level) to find a good biography on your author. Click on "Citation Tools" to grab the MLA style version of the reference for your Works Cited page.

        5. Write the first draft of Essay 1.

        6. Once you think you are ready to turn the draft in, use my Grading Checklist to self evaluate Essay 1. Print it out and put your initials next to every item that has been completed.

        Online Work for Week Five

        Note: items marked with an asterisk will count as your hour of online attendance for Week Five.
        1. Read: Extracts from Between the World and Me (2015) by Ta-Nehisi Coates
        2. Read: Kindred--"The Fight": 1-10
        3. *Write: Journal 5 (Coates)
        4. Write: Journal 6 (Kindred--"The Fight": 1-10)
        The midterm evaluation of Journals 1-6 will be Wednesday, October 25 by 9:00 AM

        When you decide to turn in Essay 1,
        • print a copy of the essay and its Works Cited page
        • attach the Grading Checklist with your self-evaluation
        • attach any slips proving you have visited the Writing Center to get help with the essay.